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Submission guidelines April 19, 2010

Posted by New Europe Writers in .
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We Value Your Submissions!

From this website I gather you are publishers. If so, can I send you the latest draft of my book manuscript for your consideration?

We are not publishers. Rather, we are an association of writers who print an annual anthology of writing from a specific country among the European accession states.

The literary translation industry in New Europe and ExPat writing clubs is huge. Where does NEW fit into all of this?

We see ourselves as being at both the literary centre and the  cutting edge of these groups. By combining expat writing and local writing in translation, we aim to capture the “spirit of place” from a variety of perspectives.

What are the pay rates?

Since our endeavour is non-profit, we do not pay for submissions published. Naturally, authors retain all rights to their work.

The work I’m submitting has already been published. Should I submit it? What’s your policy here?

Send it. If we like it, we will then ask you for your permission to reprint it and secure other relevant permissions from your publisher.

You’ll find a selection of my work on my personal website, some of which you may find suitable.

We’d rather you selected pieces according to our criteria and submit them directly.Alternatively, since ours is a ten year project, began writing something new.

Would you accept my best writing even though it is not about that theme?

No.

My work is in Slakan, the language of one of your prospective future Tales regions. Will you please translate it?

No. All submissions must be in English. Before we can publish a translation, we will need the permission of the translator as well as the author. Please refer to the “translations” links on our website for more information about finding a translator.

I’d like to submit the English translation of a tale I have written. It is consistent with your criteria and theme, but I have not informed my translator of this. Should I do so before submitting?

Yes, if at all possible. Before publishing any translation, we will need the permission of the translator as well as the author.  It is best to make sure this is sorted out before you make your submission.

I am bi-lingual. I have a story in my own language about your theme and have done my own English translation of it. As you will see, however, my English is a bit weak. Will you still consider it for publication?

Yes, provided it tells a compelling story and you state your willingness to accept the Editor’s improvements.

I’m a translator of writers’ work  from your region, and it meets your criteria. Should I submit it for your initial assessment before I contact my writer(s)?

Certainly, provided your author(s) have given you rights to your English translation of their work. If not, contact them and secure their permission in advance. In such rich and fulsome anthologies as The Tales, the submission process obviously goes through at least two stages of selection. Please do not make them any early promises.

I’ve written a totally imagined vision of the city of your next Tales. Never been there and know nothing about it. Although I’ve invented the place,  it tells a tale about it and reads well. Should I bother submitting it?

Yes, please do. We accept well-written Tales about the Imagined New Europe. We have published several such works in the past. Kafka never visited Ameryka either.

Do you except journalism or travel writing?

No. Unlike fiction, which is eternal, journalism and straight travel writing rapidly becomes dated. Our annual anthology is  about “universal perceptions” rather than current information. Of course, basing a story on actual events, or using those events in the story, is perfectly acceptable.

Do you accept literary criticism, commentary, the sociological essay, or article?

No, but we are very open to receiving reviews of our Tales. Messrs Fincham and Coon do not love sociology and Mr a’Beckett is not even sure what it is.

I’d like to submit an excerpt from my unpublished first novel which is set in the city of your next Tales. It sort of seems to stand alone as a kind of short story. Should I submit it?

Ok, but  make sure it doesn’t sort of not stand alone as a short story. Remember the reader will know nothing of the rest of your novel. We only publish excerpts that incorporate the essential ingredients of a short story- a form which is very different from the novel. Also, please make sure it contains fewer than 4000 words.

So what are your prospective next few Tales?

This is determined a lot by the response as well as the wealth and quality of submissions. This year we are looking very strongly toward publishing a revised version of Warsaw Tales in July along with Bucharest Tales in October. Bratislava Tales will hopefully follow in 2010. The Baltic countries are also competing for inclusion.

And when Turkey, Ukraine, Albania, and Macedonia join the Union?

So will N.E.W.’s anthologies, as it were.

Does poetry about the theme or based on it come under the umbrella of “Tale”?

Yes! Mr Fincham is very firm on this point. A poem can be a Tale, and we have published a lot of poetry of a very high standard. Even so, too much of the submitted poetry is merely observational. For that reason, we are especially interested in short stories because classical narration seems to have become a nearly abandoned form.

So what are your criteria for poetry?

We especially welcome poetry that has a narrative element and demonstrates a regard for form. Please do not send verbal shrapnel.

My fictional story is not about the Capital city but an obscure village in the region. Are you interested?

Yes. As you will see in Prague Tales, for example, there are stories from Brno and Moravia. In Budapest Tales, there are stories from Guyla and Transylvania. Yet, we encourage stories and poems about the capital because our literary mission statement is to encourage different perspectives on the city as a centre of the region. We have found that this focus produces a more interesting anthology, though there will always be room for exceptions.

Are you about the promotion and publication of New Europe regional literatures, such as the emerging literatures of Moldavia, Lithuania and East Slovakia, Romani, Kashubia?

No. Budapest Tales, for example, does not purport to represent contemporary Hungarian literature in English translation, though it does include some of that. We collaborate with  “Words Without Borders” and “Literature Across Frontiers” as they  focus on regional literature in translation. Naturally, your regional or ethnic origin may affect your individual point of view, which we would find interesting.

I’ve just written some tales about Budapest and Prague and Warsaw? But those Tales are already published. Any point in submitting them?

Yes. We will publish revised versions of these Tales that will include recent submissions of a high quality, but first read the original Tales volume to get an idea of what we prefer to publish.

I’d like to submit some suitable work, but my Literary Agent has tight control over it and does not approve of me sending it off to unknown parties such as N.E.W.

Ask her to contact us. We work with Literary Agents.

You  mention “our mission statement,” yet I can’t find any Mission Statement on your website, so far. Also, you say “Please refer to the “translations” links on our website for more information about finding a translator.” Neither can I find that.

Thank you for your attention and please stand by. Yet under construction, our new website moves apace. These will be up soon, very soon.

Where can I read more About N.E.W.? Your “About” is a little thin, isn’t it, for such an ambitious Project?

Stand by. We’re preparing to post a summary of the Editorial Notes to our first three anthologies.

I’d like to know more about you, the Editors of the N.E.W. Anthologies: Messrs. Fincham, Coon and a’Beckett. Sure, I’ve read your author biogs. as contributing editors, but I’d like to know a bit more about who’s judging and assessing my work. What are your credentials as Editors?

Mostly our success! As reflected by the good reviews we get about our editorship. An Englishman, American, and Australian, we unite our differing experience in editing skills and approaches of those backgrounds with a common principle. We’re broad-minded and dynamically adept at detecting, discovering, and encouraging suitable quality writing in all its forms, including good translation. And our editorship keeps to the Editing Oath. We are impartial, objective, and not biased by personal taste or looking for work that compliments our own contributions. We are also advised by local editors in the regions of our Tales who work well with us. We are constantly open to expanding our Editorial Board. So if you find us interesting and you could bring some experience to that quest, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We’re a good team, have no doubt about it!

Having read all of this, I am now ready to submit. How can I contact you?

Please go to the Contact page for more information.

deadlines-rev-22

Our Deadlines Are Flexible.

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For Educators March 25, 2010

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New Europe Writers – Educational Initiative

Using the Anthologies in the Classroom

Due to mounting interest in our anthologies as a teaching tool, New Europe Writers has launched an educational initiative to help educators and students make best use of this entertaining and instructive material. Teachers and students alike have enjoyed the way the anthologies blend contemporary East European writing in translation with expat writing on the experience of Warsaw, Prague, and Budapest. No other anthologies do this. Indeed, rather than simply a series of books, New Europe Writers is a project in which students and teachers can themselves participate.

To remain current with out activities, we invite you to join our group on Facebook . To join, please send us an email at neweuropewriters@gmail.com .

We also seek the interest of academics who are interested in the literature of the expat writer— especially the longer-term resident immersed in the literary scene and language of his or her chosen second home and sometimes influencing it. Joyce the Dubliner in Trieste helped shape the careers of Italian authors like Italo Svevo and Cesare Pavese, and Czech poet Gustav Holub influenced the direction of much contemporary British poetry in the 1960’s.

On this site, the editors of New Europe Writers, contributing authors, and translators will report on how to use the anthologies as a teaching aid and resource in the classroom. By discussing their experiences and soliciting feedback, we intend to create an active forum that will be of interest to teachers and students in a wide range of disciplines. These include ELT, ESL, Literary and Cultural Studies, Translation Studies, Creative Writing, English Philology, East Europe Philologies, Language and Contemporary Literature, East European and Slavic Studies, and Comparative Literature.

Reports from the Field

Bucharest, Romania

In April of 2010, John a’Beckett and Andy Fincham conducted a workshop in Bucharest for Romanian Master’s degree candidates studying Translation Studies under Prof. Lidia Vianu. As a result of their visit, these students have committed to translating Warsaw Tales into Romanian. Here is some additional feedback on this experience:

“Andy and John came all the way to Bucharest to meet my students (the MA Programme for the Translation of the Contemporary Literary Text. We were thrilled and grateful to be included. It was a privilege to find out the meaning of the NEW project, and we have now a long list of MA students who want to be involved. This time Europe has been welcoming, making up for all those times when we found ourselves staring from the outside.”

-Prof. Lidia Vianu, Director of MTTLC

“Meeting John a’Beckett and Andrew Fincham meant finding out about an extremely interesting project. The presentation was very lively and entertaining, and it included the chance of being given just a taste of Warsaw Tales through the reading by Andrew Fincham. What the reading of Esprit d’escalier – one of my favourites – meant? A class full of laughter. The words were very few, yet the story said so much, and I could almost see an imaginary movie scene unfolding before my eyes. Polish Autumn, also part of the reading, was among my favourites as well. And these are just a few of the reasons why I’m really looking forward to seeing Bucharest Tales coming out and perhaps even having the opportunity of translating some of them.”

-Silvia Bratu, MTTLC student

“I was very excited when I heard about John a’Beckett and Andy Fincham’s visit. It was interesting to find out about how their project started and how they thought to include Bucharest in their new collection also, to actually hear Fincham read poems and short prose from Warsaw Tales. More importantly, I am eager to participate in the translation of the collection into Romanian.”

– Carmen Dumitru, MTTLAC student

Based on the success of this workshop, and with some advance notice, Editor’s of NEW would like to invite teachers to contact us, if you would like us to bring a similar workshop to your classroom.

Florida International University

Prof. Peter Hargitai has included Budapest Tales in the syllabus for his course in Contemporary Hungarian Literature, which is taken mostly by Cuban ESL students. He comments:

“I myself was so taken with the little green book and its dayglo red vignette showing a writer either sneezing or snorting Angel Dust or worse (anthrax comes to mind) that I ordered it for my ESL classes for students whose mastery of English is about par with the critics. ..”

Some seventy-five students were asked choose a piece they most enjoyed from Budapest Tales and write an 800 word essay explaining why. George Szirtes’s translation of Monika Mesterhazy’s poem “Journal” proved to be the most popular. Here is the poem:

Monika Mesterhazi – Journal

Two people are talking. Or at least their eyes are.

Their two boats are tied up to one another.

One is speaking a foreign language

In the city of the other, chatting away.

The waves are the same for both of them.

The boats are rocking to the same rhythm.

Later, their bodies. They are still strangers.

They melt away, they’re free.

They never meet again. In their letters

Questions about essays, answers from diaries.

The water shows their quite distinct reflections

Here is a summary of some of the students’ comments.

The students brought some of their Hispanic-American cultural background to the selection and interpretation of the pieces. Such themes as love, estrangement, sexuality, and a certain familiarity with the absurdities of post-Socialism were picked up. The more advanced tackled the satiric stories of Istvan Orkeny, especially “Ballad on the Magic of Poetry”, and then James G. Coon’s very short tale “Gramzaphat” and Sue Healey’s “I Am Not A Muse.” Students saw the narrators of these tales as protagonists, and thus posed and attempted to answer questions such as “Why this point of view? This take?” In general, their essays demonstrated a curiosity for what Hungarian writers perceive of Budapest in contrast to the resident expats.

Editors comment:

Thanks Peter and students! The course was proof positive that The Tales can act as a stimulating and popular tool for the teaching of English As A Second Language.

Where To Buy February 5, 2009

Posted by New Europe Writers in .
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Ljubljana_TalesLjubljana Tales

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ljubljana-Tales

The Lost Bookshelf
Červená Barva Press Bookstore. U.S.A.
http://www.thelostbookshelf.com

Mladinska knjiga Trgovina d.o.o.
Slovenska 29, 1000 Ljubljana
Tel.: + 386 (0) 1 560 5582
dragica.drugovic@mk-trgovina.si
http://www.mladinska.com

Anthony Frost English Bookshop
45 Calea Victoriei Bucharest
Website: http://www.librariaengleza.ro
Phone and Email: vlad@librariaengleza.ro +40 21 311 51 38

Tarabuk – ksiegarnia & kawiarnia
http://www.tarabuk.pl
Browarna 6 01-001 Warszawa
tel. (22) 827 08 14 e-mail: tarabuk@tarabuk.pl

Massolit Bookshop
Ul. Felicjanek, 4 Krakow
tel.: +48 12 432 4150
email: info@massolit.com
http://www.massolit.com

Bucharest_Tales

Bucharest Tales
http://www.amazon.com/Bucharest-Tales   uk.

Anthony Frost English Bookshop
45 Calea Victoriei  Bucharest
Website: http://www.librariaengleza.ro
Phone and Email: vlad@librariaengleza.ro +40 21 311 51 38

The Lost Bookshelf
Červená Barva Press Bookstore. U.S.A.
http://www.thelostbookshelf.com/index.html

Tarabuk – ksiegarnia & kawiarnia
http://www.tarabuk.pl
Browarna 6 01-001 Warszawa
tel. (22) 827 08 14 e-mail: tarabuk@tarabuk.pl …

Massolit Bookshop
Ul. Felicjanek, 4  Krakow
tel.: +48 12 432 4150
email: info@massolit.com
http://www.massolit.com

 

Warsaw Tales

Tarabuk – ksiegarnia & kawiarnia
http://www.tarabuk.pl
Browarna 6 01-001 Warszawa
tel. (22) 827 08 14 e-mail: tarabuk@tarabuk.pl …

Głowna Ksiegarnia Naukowa im. B. Prusa
Krakowskie Przedmiesce 7
00-068 Warszawa
tel.(+48) (0)22 827 64 79
gnk@prus24.pl
http://www.prus24.pl

The Lost Bookshelf
Červená Barva Press Bookstore. U.S.A.
http://www.thelostbookshelf.com/index.html

Tarabuk – ksiegarnia & kawiarnia
http://www.tarabuk.pl
Browarna 6 01-001 Warszawa
tel. (22) 827 08 14 e-mail: tarabuk@tarabuk.pl …

Anthony Frost English Bookshop
45 Calea Victoriei  Bucharest
Website: http://www.librariaengleza.ro
Phone and Email: vlad@librariaengleza.ro +40 21 311 51 38

Massolit Bookshop
Ul. Felicjanek, 4  Krakow
tel.: +48 12 432 4150
email: info@massolit.com
http://www.massolit.com

GRANT & CUTLER LTD.
Foreign Language Booksellers
55-57 Great Malborough Street
London W1F 7AY
Tel. +44 (0)20 7734
Contact: Nadya Gabrys
email: ng@grantandcutler.com

The Foreign Book Source Inc.
5948 N. Bernard Street
Chicago IL 60659
USA
http://www.foreignbooksource.com
info@foreignbooksource.com

 

Budapest Tales

Bestsellers Bookshop, Budapest
1051 Budapest, Október 6. utca 11.
Telephone / Fax: 312-1295
E-Mail: bestsellers@bestsellers.hu

Pendragon CEU Bookstore Budapest
V. Nador u.9, Budapest
Tel. 327 3096. email: bookshop@ceu.hu

Anthony Frost English Bookshop, Bucharest
45 Calea Victoriei
Bucharest
Website: http://www.librariaengleza.ro
Phone and Email: vlad@librariaengleza.ro +40 21 311 51 38

Shearer’s Bookshop
99 Norton St
Leichhardt,
Sydney
NSW 2040
(02) 9572 7766

Collected Works Bookshop
Level 1, Nicholas Building
37 Swanson Street
Melbourne, Victoia 3000
Tel. 00 3 9654 8873
email: collectedworks@mailcity.co
http://www.collectedworks-poetryideas.bigspot.com

Dymocks- IFC Mall
Shop 2007 – 11, Level 2
IFC Mall
1 Harbour View Street
Hong Kong
Store Manager / Franchise Owner: Robert Chan
Phone: (852) 2117 0362
Fax: (852) 2117 0239
Email: dymocksifc@biznetvigator.com

JAIN Book Agency

C-9, Connaught Place
New Delhi – 110001
Phone. +91-11-2341 6390/91/92/93/94,
EMAIL: SALES@JAINBOOKAGENCY.COM

Foreign Book Source Inc.
5948 N. Bernard Street
Chicago
IL 60659
USA
http://www.foreignbooksource.com
info@foreignbooksource.com

Prague Tales

Prague

Globe
Pstrossova 6
110 00, Praha 1
Tel/fax: +420-224 934 203
Email:globe@globebookstore.cz

Shakespeare and Sons
U Luzickeho seminare
10 Prague
tel. +420-257 531 894
http://www.shakes.cz
questions@shakes.cz

Big Ben Bookshop
Mala Stupartska 5
110 00 Prague 1
Tel. 22482-6565
Fax on 22482-6559
e-mail books@bigbenbookshop.com
http://www.bigbenbookshop.com

Anagram Bookshop
Tyn 4 Zip
110 00 Prague
Tel. 420 224 895 737
Fax 420 224 895 738

Bratislava

Eurobooks
Jesenskeho 5-9
811 01 Bratislava
http://www.eurobooks.sk
tel: +421-2-5441 7959, +421-905-566 973
info@eurobooks.sk

Budapest

Bestsellers
1051 Budapest, Október 6. utca 11.
Telephone / Fax: 312-1295
E-Mail: bestsellers@bestsellers.hu

Pendragon KFT
CEU Bookshop
1051 Budapest, Zrinyi u. 12

English bookshop
Bookshop at ceu.hu
Hungary. Tel. 36-1-340-4426

Warsaw

American Bookstore
ul Nowy Swiat 61; or ul Koszykowa 55
and in Sadyba Best Mall ul Powsinska 31
Tel: +48 827 48 52; or +48 660 56 37
and +48 550 31 73

Krakow

Massolit Bookshop
Ul. Felicjanek, 4
Krakow
tel.: +48 12 432 4150
fax: +48 12 432 4151
email: info@massolit.com
http://www.massolit.com

Belgrade

The Mamut Megastore in Belgrade
http://www.ips.co.yu
office@ips.co.yu
The corner of Sremska and Knez Mihajlova
11000 Belgrade
Phone: 011 639 060

Frankfurt

Sudseite International Buchandland
55 Kaiserstrasse.
60329 Frankfurt 1
tel. 069 252914

Paris

C/O Rachel Cohen
14, rue Jules Dumien
75020 Paris
Rec1977@hotmailcom

Australia
Collected Works
Level 1, Nicholas Building
37 Swanston Street
Melbourne
Australia

Głowna Ksiegarnia Naukowa im. B. Prusa
Krakowskie Przedmiescie 7
00-068 Warszawa
tel.(+48) (0)22 827 64 79
gnk@prus24.pl
http://www.prus24.pl

Głowna Ksiegarnia Naukowa im. B. Prusa

Krakowskie Przedmiesce 7

00-068 Warszawa

tel.(+48) (0)22 827 64 79

gnk@prus24.pl

http://www.prus24.pl

Interview with John a‘Beckett, Managing Editor of New Europe Writers, in Polish and English March 2, 2013

Posted by New Europe Writers in Selected Tales, Uncategorized, Warsaw Tales.
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johnbW polskim pubie

Christian Mailoux, współredaktor Červená Barva Press, przeprowadza wywiad z Johnem a’Beckettem, współzałożycielem New Europe Writers.

Założył pan New Europe Writers wraz z Jamesem G. Coonem i Andrew Finchamem. Jak poznał pan tych ludzi i co zainspirowało długotrwałą współpracę?

Poznaliśmy się przez przypadek, w Radio Cafe, w Warszawie, w 2006. Patrząc z perspektywy czasu, wydaje mi się to raczej jak szczęśliwy traf. (more…)

Masthead April 19, 2010

Posted by New Europe Writers in .
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John a’Beckett – Founding and Managing Editor

(b. Melbourne, Australia, 1948) He is a poet and radio playwright residing in Warsaw. He came to Poland in 1995 on a Potter Foundation Grant for The Melbourne Writers.

James G. Coon – Founding Co-Editor and Prose Editor

(b. Cincinnati, USA, 1950) After graduating from Yale University in 1973, he worked in the corporate world until the Nineties when he joined the assistance efforts underway in Central and Eastern Europe, helping companies to adjust to the new reality. During nearly ten years living in Poland, he became a fiction writer and freelance editor and co-founded New Europe Writers. He currently resides in Bangkok, where he continues this work in a warmer climate.

Andrew Fincham – Founding and Poetry Editor

(b. Staffordshire, England, 1964) His poetry has appeared in over a dozen anthologies. The bilingual Centre of Gravity (Ibis 2004) received the UNESCO / Poezja Dzisiaj award for foreign poetry in Poland.

Kazimierz Zwidryn – Sales/ Promotion Manager, Poland

For the past twenty years, Kaz has been the head English Editor, Chief Sales Manager and East European Liaison Officer of The International Publishing Service in Warsaw.

Katalin Szekeres – Sales/Promotion Manager, Hungary

(b. Budapest. 1982) She is a part-time Hungarian-to-English translator and manager of a successful modeling agency in Budapest.

Veronika Lukacs – Sales and Promotion Manager, London/UK

(b..Budapest, 1977) She studied at Tokyo and London Universities and earned an MA in English from the Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest. She has translated for Budapest Tales .

Natasha Kirshina – Sales and Promotion Manager, Czech Republic

(b. St. Petersburg, 1988) She is a student at the Anglo-American University in Prague.

Educational Book Market Advisor – Vacant

Ryszard Kajzer – Book Production Editor

He is a graduate and staff member of the Graphic Department of Warsaw Polytech. He has won awards for posters and book cover designs.

Bartek Bartosiński — Website consultant

Wojciech Maslarz – Polish Editor and Polish Translation Advisor

(b. Kutno, Poland, 1962) A philologist, English teacher, poet, and translator, he has recently published two chapbooks of verse entitled “The Image of the Minotaur” and “Girardoff City.”

Judith Sollosy – Hungarian Editor and Translation Advisor

(b. Hungary) She has a degree in English Literature from Columbia University. Since 1975 she has been living in Budapest where she is senior editor at Covina Books.

Florin Bican – Romanian Editor and Translation Advisor

(b. Rumania) A graduate of the University of Bucharest, he has been in charge of the Romanian Culture Institute’s program “Translators in the Making” since 2006. This program trains foreign students of Romanian.